I’ve been sketching these concepts for a while now, so I figured I should probably publish the general idea somewhere.
As seen in a previous post of mine, bulbasaur develops underground and can feed and defend itself relatively easily without ever emerging. However, if the soil is disturbed too much or the bulb is pulled out, the connection it has to the nutrients there is lost for the rest of its life. Bulbasaur can only grow into Ivysaur or Venusaur if it stays in the ground; once it’s out, it stays out.
Charmander isn’t as complicated. It will develop its crest and wings over time without any special conditions. However, some strains never live in areas where they could use wings, such as in cave systems. Usually what will happen there is the wings start to grow but stop developing once they realize the environment they’re in. And no, taking that charmander out of the cave won’t let the wings continue growing. So if you want a charizard, your best bet is to find a charmander living outside.
Squirtle is odd. When it’s young, it has a long, tadpole-like tail. It starts off relying solely on the sensitivity of its tail to feel around; they don’t have good eyes. However, eventually they grow feelers on their head to help out a little more. This makes them a little better at hunting, since just having a sensitive tail is only really good for knowing when to swim away from danger. Blastoise is related, but they aren’t even close to the same species anymore. Artificial selection through extensive breeding caused some squirtles to develop stronger limbs for walking and others to develop the little cannons for easier movement in the water. When breeders forced them to mate, they found that the traits were compatible with each other, which resulted in a land-dwelling squirtle that could shoot water. To get a “true” blastoise, trainers typically have to overfeed them with protein and way too much water. You have to be in it for the long-haul if you want one to be big, though. They grow very slowly and can keep developing for more than half of their 150-year lifespan.

I’ve been sketching these concepts for a while now, so I figured I should probably publish the general idea somewhere.

  • As seen in a previous post of mine, bulbasaur develops underground and can feed and defend itself relatively easily without ever emerging. However, if the soil is disturbed too much or the bulb is pulled out, the connection it has to the nutrients there is lost for the rest of its life. Bulbasaur can only grow into Ivysaur or Venusaur if it stays in the ground; once it’s out, it stays out.
  • Charmander isn’t as complicated. It will develop its crest and wings over time without any special conditions. However, some strains never live in areas where they could use wings, such as in cave systems. Usually what will happen there is the wings start to grow but stop developing once they realize the environment they’re in. And no, taking that charmander out of the cave won’t let the wings continue growing. So if you want a charizard, your best bet is to find a charmander living outside.
  • Squirtle is odd. When it’s young, it has a long, tadpole-like tail. It starts off relying solely on the sensitivity of its tail to feel around; they don’t have good eyes. However, eventually they grow feelers on their head to help out a little more. This makes them a little better at hunting, since just having a sensitive tail is only really good for knowing when to swim away from danger. Blastoise is related, but they aren’t even close to the same species anymore. Artificial selection through extensive breeding caused some squirtles to develop stronger limbs for walking and others to develop the little cannons for easier movement in the water. When breeders forced them to mate, they found that the traits were compatible with each other, which resulted in a land-dwelling squirtle that could shoot water. To get a “true” blastoise, trainers typically have to overfeed them with protein and way too much water. You have to be in it for the long-haul if you want one to be big, though. They grow very slowly and can keep developing for more than half of their 150-year lifespan.
Practice makes perfect? I know I keep drawing bulbasaurs, but I figure that the more I draw them, the better my stuff with look. Am I improving?

Practice makes perfect? I know I keep drawing bulbasaurs, but I figure that the more I draw them, the better my stuff with look. Am I improving?

kateordie:

ryan-andrews-comics:

CONTINUED IN PART 2
Click here to read the rest of Sarah and the Seed for free!

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

ALSO: You can now make a pledge through Kickstarter to get Sarah and the Seed, and my other short stories, in print! The campaign runs until May 31.

CLICK HERE TO GO THE KICKSTARTER CAMPAIGN

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

This is a beautiful comic! Support it, if you can!

This is absolutely adorable and terrifyingly creepy. I’m in love.

catandcrown:

Oh good god they’re done. 

all 8 commissions. i shall never be taking on that many at once again. 

There still may be some tweaks to the final one, but overall this is all completed. The final one in the set is a special Hairless Raticate called Harvey, on the commissioners request :) Whilst this does look just like a giant rat, originally i had planed to give it very spiky fur that leant itself more to the original design. 

*sobs* I am so glad these are done. hope you like them all as a set guys and gals, especially the people that commissioned them!

So glad I was able to be a part of this list! My commission was the final one Jamie mentions, and it’s super exciting to see it basically complete. Thanks again, Jamie!